What You Can Do

If You Have an Ash Tree

If you have an ash tree you need to evaluate and plan for their protection or removal.  Your choice of actions and urgency will depend on factors that include the current health of the tree, the costs of treatment and removal, and how close you are to known infestations. 

  • Planting a diverse urban forest makes it more resistant to pests.
  • Once a tree becomes infested it will die unless you are able to treat it soon after it becomes infested.

Managing Emerald Ash Borer: Decision Guide

Management

Within 2 miles of known infestation

If you have an ash tree on your property and you are within 2 miles of the known infestations you need to decide if you will remove or treat your ash trees.  

Treatment needs to occur in April-May.  If you hire a contractor, they need to be licensed as a Commercial Applicator by the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

More than 2 miles of known location

If you have an ash tree on your property and you are more than 2 miles of the known infestations you should:

  • Monitor your trees and look for thinning in the upper canopy
  • Water regularly including winter and fall watering
  • You may want to plan on their eventual replacement with a different type of tree
  • If there are no signs of decline it is not necessary to treat unless there are other insect pests affecting your ash trees

Front Range Tree Recommendation List©  

Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from EAB

Managing Emerald Ash Borer: Decision Guide

Control Options for EAB in CO

Don’t Move It

Because EAB can survive in ash wood, it is best if you do not move it unless you take precautions.

EAB Options for safe handling of Ash-Tree Wood

Firewood and Pests Recommendations

Biological Control

Colorado is working with USDA APHIS to develop biological control agents that may control EAB.

USDA’s Emerald Ash Borer Biocontrol Program